The Lucky Country

Project Info

CoCo thumbnail

Team Members


Nick Wong , Luke Carter and 1 other member with an unpublished profile.

Project Description


The producers of The Lucky Country acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the Lands on which this work was develop on and pay respects to Elders past, present and emerging.

The Lucky Country is a text based digital artwork examining Australia's collective views of our First Nations and multicultural communities through the sentiments of those elected to represent us. In doing so it does not seek to highlight a political divide nor elevate one party above another (all quotes appear unattributed) but establish whether there exists an overall societal discourse and look at how this has changed over the years. Through this, The Lucky Country examines whether Australia's luck and prosperity are endeared to all who seek it.

The Lucky Country is a text based digital artwork examining Australia's collective views of our First Nations and multicultural communities through the sentiments of those elected to represent us. In doing so it does not seek to highlight a political divide nor elevate one party above another (all quotes appear unattributed) but establish whether there exists an overall societal discourse and how this has changed over the years. Through this, The Lucky Country examines whether Australia's luck and prosperity are endeared to all who seek it.

'The Lucky Country' is a text based digital artwork examining Australia's collective views of our First Nations and multicultural communities through the sentiments of those elected to represent us. In doing so it does not seek to highlight a political divide nor elevate one party above another (all quotes appear unattributed), but establish whether there exists an overall societal discourse and how this has changed over the years. Through this, 'The Lucky Country' examines whether Australia's luck and prosperity is endeared to all who seek it.


Data Story


The Lucky Country uses sentiment analysis against the language of our nation’s leaders, through scraping politicians’ speeches to identify language associated with race and racism alongside the correlating year of release. This sentiment analysis bolds key phrases within presented quotes – highlighting themes for viewers to dwell upon. Through this The Lucky Country encourages all of us fortunate to call Australia home, to consider the prevalence of themes of race and racism in the speeches of our nation’s leaders and what this means for our society as a whole. Do the mentions of race indicate a persistence of racism in our culture? Do the mouths of our national representatives truly represent where we want to head as a community and society? How can we make Australia The Lucky Country for all?


Evidence of Work

Video

Homepage

Team DataSets

Commonwealth of Australia Hansard

Description of Use Data used to scrape sentiment analysis to identify language associated with race and racism, alongside correlating year of release.

Data Set

PM Transcripts repository

Description of Use Data used to scrape sentiment analysis to identify language associated with race and racism, alongside correlating year of release.

Data Set

Politicians talking about 'immigrants' and 'refugees'

Description of Use Data used to scrape sentiment analysis to identify language associated with race and racism, alongside correlating year of release.

Data Set

Challenges

The language of leadership

In times of crisis words can inspire and unite us, but they can also provoke division and conflict. How has the language of Australia’s leaders changed over time? How can we represent these changes in public discourse within a historical timeline?

Go to Challenge | 7 teams have entered this challenge.

Awareness, understanding and respect – How can Open Data help the #BLM movement?

The Black Lives Matter (#BLM) movement is not new, neither are racial injustices. However, in 2020 a series of racially motivated deaths, brutality and profiling in the US sent shockwaves around the world. Over 15 Million people took to the streets around the world to protest, and demand change. What can Open Government Data do to help the movement?

Go to Challenge | 5 teams have entered this challenge.