Seequence

Project Info

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Team Members


James , Steven and 1 other member with an unpublished profile.

Project Description


SEEQUENCE - WHERE NOW?
- Retain and showcase Fremantle’s soul - the amazing cultures and ambiances (plural!) of the city - showcasing it to both new and existing residents (and of course the many tourists)
- Ease congestion - Seequence will promote public transportation as well as use algorithms to distribute footfall around the city - we’ve found both traffic congestion and finding a parking to be major issues!
- Seequence creator opinions: Seequence creators (i.e. Freo residents!) are able to share their opinions on different locations, including reviews for shops, restaurants and other , while users will be able to rate and give feedback on the Seequences that they embark on.
- As a curious (or bored!) resident or as a tourist: what to do in Fremantle? Who can be my tour guide for the day (and compare routes based on their star-ratings!). Find what’s on TODAY.
- Way to learn about your city - fun facts as you pass them, such as did you know this is where the Old Tram used to be? (just by Chalkys Espresso Bar!)
- Find package deals on entertainment, food and drink, arts and culture, and the like (not too dissimilar to the Entertainment Book’s deals but packaged by a knowledgeable and well-rated Freo resident!)

Fremantle is a beautiful city rich with history, a thriving nightlife. Fremantle is the city of soul in Western Australia. Seequence is an app that takes visitors and residents on adventures (called “Seequences”) through Freo to experience it’s soul. Following a Seequence is much more than just visiting some shops, locations or landmarks, it's all about sharing a unique experience of the city. Seequences come in many shapes, sizes and themes. Whether it be a cultural experience exploring Noongar heritage and history, a shopping trip exploring the various small shops arounds Fremantle, a foodie-crawl through the cafe’s and pubs that make up Freo, or simply a Seequence that suggests going to a nearby café after visiting a local artist’s studio.
Seequence allows you to comment about your daytrip or your night out, and share it in a way that others can follow the exact same Seequence. This allows the residents of Fremantle - those who live and breathe the city - to be virtual tour guides for other residents and tourists alike. Follow ‘influencers’ who you align with. Party animal? I’m sure Mark McGowan’s Seequence will take you through the best clubs in Fremantle. Want to explore the shoreline? Resident Roel Loopers has a jetty-to-jetty Seequence which he thinks is pretty neat. Not sure what to do this afternoon? Roel also has his favourite ‘An afternoon at Manjaree’ Seequence exploring the art and cultural pieces by Victoria Quay ending with a drink at Manjaree (Bathers Beach).
Seequence also has Points of Interest, taken from open data, which notify you according to your interests and app settings. A notification pops up on your phone when you pass a topic that you have subscribed to. For example, a user who has enabled tracking and notifications will get some information about the heritage site when they pass The Roundhouse. For those who don't want to have location tracking enabled on their phones, we could utilise QR codes at significant places. This has already been implemented on a small scale in a project called Freopedia - a collaboration between the Fremantle Society and Wikimedia Australia, supported by the City of Fremantle, State Records Office, Fremantle Business Improvement District, Fremantle Port Authority, and other organisations in Fremantle. An example would be the QR code on the wall by Chalkys Espresso Bar directs to the 'Trams in Fremantle' Wikipedia page.


#app #discover #adventure #local tourism #fremantle

Data Story


Seequence is an app primarily oriented around locations (including historical landmarks, stores, and other points of interest), events, and transport. As such, Sequence pivots off and draws together multiple open data sources.
- OpenStreetMaps: This publicly curated, open dataset is the main source of geographic information used to mark and classify locations on the Seequence map. This includes location information on monuments, museums, shops, bars, cafe’s, beaches, and parking lots. This dataset is accessible via an API, which would be capable of pulling down the latest information.
- Wikidata: We can combine the geographic data from OpenStreetMaps with data from Wikidata to provide detailed information on historical landmarks.
- Public Transport Authority Stops (PTA-001; linked in mockup); Public Transport Authority Service Routes (PTA-002; linked in mockup); and TransPerth JourneyPlanner API: The Perth Transport Authority has open data on bus routes and bus stop locations. Using this data would allow Seequence to mark routes and stops on the Seequence map, as well as suggest public transport to users as they start their Seequence, or travel between Seequence points of interest. The TransPerth JourneyPlanner API also makes it easy to create links to specific journey routes. This would allow Seequence to have clickable links that users can open in the TransPerth app in order to easily plan out their transport.
- Beach Emergency Numbers (BEN) Signage (DPIRD-054; linked in mockup): DPIRD-054 is an example of Points of Interest that can be included in our app. This open data source can be relied upon to list many beaches across Australia and perhaps signify a specific meeting point along the beach (the dataset has instructions for emergency personnel that in the same way could benefit the public to get to that beach). Bathers Beach - Manjaree in Noongar Aboriginal - is an example of a longer beach with 3 BEN signs. The F98 sign could be a more specific place to meet.
- WA Public Libraries
- Aboriginal Heritage Places (DPLH-001); Heritage Council WA - Local Heritage Survey (DPLH-008); and Heritage Council WA - State Register (DPLH-006)
- Geographic Names (GEONOMA) (LGATE-013)
- DBCA Long Trails (DBCA-027)
- WA Tomorrow Report 11 - SA2 Forecasts (DPLH-086)
- City of Fremantle Facilities app
- City of Fremantle Heritage app
- … (i.e. plenty more!)


Evidence of Work

Video

Team DataSets

City of Fremantle Heritage app

Description of Use Possible use

City of Fremantle Facilities app

Description of Use Possible use

WA Tomorrow Report 11 - SA2 Forecasts (DPLH-086)

Description of Use Possible use

Aboriginal Heritage Places (DPLH-001); Heritage Council WA - Local Heritage Survey (DPLH-008); and Heritage Council WA - State Register (DPLH-006)

Description of Use Possible use

WikiData

Description of Use Possible use

OpenMapData

Description of Use Possible use

Data Set

Beach Emergency Numbers (BEN) Signage (DPIRD-054)

Description of Use Linked in mockup

TransPerth JourneyPlanner API

Description of Use Possible use

Public Transport Authority Service Routes (PTA-002)

Description of Use Linked in mockup

Public Transport Authority Stops (PTA-001)

Description of Use Linked in mockup

Challenge Entries

Most outstanding benefit to the residents of Fremantle 2022

How can we use Open Data to most benefit residents of Fremantle?

Eligibility: Must use at least one open dataset.

Go to Challenge | 4 teams have entered this challenge.

Integrate Disparate Data Sources like a Palantir Engineer

When working with our customers worldwide, our most successful outcomes come from our ability to make sense out of high degrees of complexity. We think that leveraging our existing toolkits and performing data fusion in your projects will help you better solve the problems of GovHack 2022.

Eligibility: Fuse multiple sources of data into a single pane of glass (such as graphs or pivot tables); and/or leverage the Blueprint UI Toolkit in some or all of your designs and prototypes.

Go to Challenge | 9 teams have entered this challenge.

Best Creative Use of Data in Response to ESG (AU)

How can you showcase data in a creative manner to respond to ESG challenges? How can we present and visualise data to stimulate conversation and promote change?

Eligibility: Must use a least one Australian relevant dataset - combining datasets preferred.

Go to Challenge | 31 teams have entered this challenge.