Challenges for Competition 2020

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Region Name Sponsors Entries meta
Australia Assisting job seekers to take advantage of digital employment services Department of Education, Skills & Employment 9 How might we use our de-identified data on job seekers, and other data that are publicly available, to discover new opportunities for job seekers to best use digital employment services. The Department of Education, Skills and Employment delivers the Australian Government’s employment services system, jobactive, to get more Australians into work and help connect job seekers with employers. When job seekers participate in employment services, which includes services delivered online or through digital channels, the department collects data on a confidential basis. We want participants at GovHack 2020 to use our de-identified data on job seekers, and other data that are publicly available, to discover new opportunities for job seekers to best use digital employment services. This may include local resources and information that might be available. Participants should focus on what they think could be beneficial job seekers, including app development, data visualisation, extrapolating new insights etc. We encourage participants to think outside the box and utilise publicly available information and data in their solutions. Feel free to get creative! ### Additional Information: We encourage participants to use a wide variety of publicly available data, including but not limited to the use of the [Australian Digital Inclusion Index](https://digitalinclusionindex.org.au/the-index-report/report/) (ADII) and [Household Income Labour and Dynamics in Australia](https://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/hilda/for-data-users) (HILDA).
International Awareness, understanding and respect – How can Open Data help the #BLM movement? GovHack 5 The Black Lives Matter (#BLM) movement is not new, neither are racial injustices. However, in 2020 a series of racially motivated deaths, brutality and profiling in the US sent shockwaves around the world. Over 15 Million people took to the streets around the world to protest, and demand change. What can Open Government Data do to help the movement? How can Open Government Data increase awareness of racial injustices, encourage understanding and build respect. How can Open Data help Indigenous peoples? If Open Data is not available for your idea, what data could you use? And what would you do with the data? ### Additional Information: **Photo credit:** Photo by [Chris Henry via Unsplash](https://unsplash.com/photos/E77SjOPCE5Y)
Tasmania Best Use of Tasmanian Heritage Data (GoHack 2020) Department of Premier and Cabinet, Tasmania 6 How can we use data to showcase Tasmania’s history, people and stories? Using Tasmanian data, build a solution that showcases Tasmania’s history, people and stories. ### Additional Information: **Additional links:** https://libraries.tas.gov.au/archive-heritage/Pages/default.aspx
Tasmania Best Use of Tasmanian Spatial Data (GovHack 2020) Department of Premier and Cabinet, Tasmania 7 How can you use Tasmanian spatial data to improve life for Tasmanian residents or businesses? This challenge is to encourage contestants to analyse and put to best use of Tasmanian spatial data.
Queensland Bushfire Ready Queensland Government 12 What can we do to prevent or prepare for bushfires? In Australia during the last 12 months over 18 million hectares of land have been burnt, over 30 people killed, more than 3000 houses lost and roughly a billion animals have perished. How can we help Queenslanders prepare for bushfires? What can we do to reduce the risk of fires occurring or causing damage to property or wildlife? ### Additional Information: **Also see:** https://www.data.qld.gov.au/article/news-and-events/queenslands-govhack-2020-challenges
Australian Capital Territory Canberra Bouncing Back – a resilient City ACT Government 10 How can we use data to help Canberra recover from the bushfires and COVID-19 pandemic and foster a city that is resilient against future disruptions? The bushfires, hailstorm and COVID-19 pandemic have had economic, health and social impacts on our community. People have had to adjust the way they work, learn, play and connect with services and each other. Some of these changes will be long lasting - we may need additional community services, we may require different employment/skills, we may require different urban planning strategies and we may need different methods to move people and goods around our city. Our major prize will be for the project that best shows how you’ve used data to build a picture of how Canberra can become a more resilient city and reduce the impact of future disruptions. The project will show a picture of Canberra in some or all of the following areas: • Transport • Health • Community Services • Employment and skills • Environment and planning • Digital Inclusion ### Additional Information: For example - What critical services are needed for the greater wellbeing and economic prosperity of our community? How can re-skilling people reduce impact of unemployment? What are the urban planning requirements for our CBD and suburbs? What is the impact on the environment as we return to our normal lives and how can we ensure the impact on the environment is sustainable? What infrastructure changes are required to support the way we work in the future and ensure people aren’t disadvantaged in a more digital city? We will also offer four runners up prizes for projects that focusing on at least one of the areas.
Australian Capital Territory Canberra Bouncing Back - Better real time transport data for Canberra ACT Government 1 Transport Canberra is responsible for administering both the ACTs bus and light rail services. One challenge is that the Real Time Passenger Information System (RTPIS) on buses (NXTBUS) was established in 2011, while the Light Rail RTPIS was introduced in 2019. The challenge of delivering an integrated transport network is diverse, but the data challenge that presents is that the NXTBUS system produces a SIRI standard and the Light Rail system produces a newer GTFS-R feed. The challenge for Transport Canberra is: • To convert the SIRI standard feed to GTFS-R; and, • Combine the NEW GTFS-R feed for buses with the LR GTFS-R feed to provide a single source of data for customers and app developers. Transport Canberra is responsible for administering both the ACTs bus and light rail services. The challenge of delivering an integrated transport network is diverse and data challenges makes measuring the impact of people movement on the network during bushfires and COVID-19 harder. One challenge is that the Real Time Passenger Information System (RTPIS) on buses (NXTBUS) was established in 2011, while the Light Rail RTPIS was introduced in 2019. The data challenge that exists is that the NXTBUS system produces a SIRI standard and the Light Rail system produces a newer GTFS-R feed. The Customers First challenge involves: • Converting the SIRI standard feed to GTFS-R; and, • Combining the NEW GTFS-R feed for buses with the LR GTFS-R feed to provide a single source of data for customers and app developers. The intent of this challenge is to demonstrate firstly, proof of concept that the bus SIRI feed can be converted successfully to a GTFS-R feed. If this can be achieved, the next challenge is again a proof of concept that the LR GTFS-R and NEW Bus GTFS-R can be combined into a single data feed. ### Additional Information: Transport Canberra information on data feeds is available here: https://www.transport.act.gov.au/contact-us/information-for-developers NXTBUS SIRI Feed API Key - C57DB8 LR GTFS-R Feed - http://files.transport.act.gov.au/feeds/lightrail.pb SIRI Standard – https://apifriends.com/api-streaming/understanding-service-interface-real-time-information-siri-standard/ GTFS-R Standard – https://developers.google.com/transit/gtfs-realtime Transport Canberra developer information - https://www.transport.act.gov.au/contact-us/information-for-developers **Technical Documentation links:** https://drive.google.com/file/d/1RVz6SQhBDkL2Sg3b5oe0LIKnv50nGzPW/view?usp=sharing https://drive.google.com/file/d/1J1yAIJEfd9dQZ0pA167svviAnvh0_bC9/view?usp=sharing https://drive.google.com/file/d/1hLn8SljWuErni2udngS-gMjP4sWTAF4Z/view?usp=sharing
Australian Capital Territory Canberra Bouncing Back - First Hacker ACT Government 4 How can we use data to help Canberra recover from the bushfires and COVID-19 pandemic and foster a city that is resilient against future disruptions? The bushfires, hailstorm and COVID-19 pandemic have had economic, health and social impacts on our community. People have had to adjust the way they work, learn, play and connect with services and each other. Some of these changes will be long lasting - we may need additional community services, we may require different employment/skills, we may require different urban planning strategies and we may need different methods to move people and goods around our city. Our First Hackers prize will be for the project that best shows how you’ve used data to build a picture of how Canberra can become a more resilient city and reduce the impact of future disruptions. The project will show a picture of Canberra in some or all of the following areas: • Transport • Health • Community Services • Employment and skills • Environment and planning • Digital Inclusion ### Additional Information: For example - What critical services are needed for the greater wellbeing and economic prosperity of our community? How can re-skilling people reduce impact of unemployment? What are the urban planning requirements for our CBD and suburbs? What is the impact on the environment as we return to our normal lives and how can we ensure the impact on the environment is sustainable? What infrastructure changes are required to support the way we work in the future and ensure people aren’t disadvantaged in a more digital city?
Australian Capital Territory Canberra Bouncing Back - Youth Hacker ACT Government 0 How can we use data to help Canberra recover from the bushfires and COVID-19 pandemic and foster a city that is resilient against future disruptions? The bushfires, hailstorm and COVID-19 pandemic have had economic, health and social impacts on our community. People have had to adjust the way they work, learn, play and connect with services and each other. Some of these changes will be long lasting - we may need additional community services, we may require different employment/skills, we may require different urban planning strategies and we may need different methods to move people and goods around our city. Our Youth Hacker prize will be for the project that best shows how you’ve used data to build a picture of how Canberra can become a more resilient city and reduce the impact of future disruptions. The project will show a picture of Canberra in some or all of the following areas: • Transport • Health • Community Services • Employment and skills • Environment and planning • Digital Inclusion ### Additional Information: For example - What critical services are needed for the greater wellbeing and economic prosperity of our community? How can re-skilling people reduce impact of unemployment? What are the urban planning requirements for our CBD and suburbs? What is the impact on the environment as we return to our normal lives and how can we ensure the impact on the environment is sustainable? What infrastructure changes are required to support the way we work in the future and ensure people aren’t disadvantaged in a more digital city?
International Caring for the Aged in COVID Times Infosys 18 How can we reimagine the aged care experience Global and Australian experience shows that during COVID times, the oldest amongst us are at the greatest risk. Our Aged Care Facilities have our most vulnerable citizens in their care and communicable diseases are an ever-present risk. Global and Australian experience with COVID-19 has shown all of us how vulnerable these facilities can be, and we know that even the Flu season can be devastating. We are looking for ideas addressing the risk of pandemics and keeping the elderly safe. Can we look at innovative solutions that can be easily accessed and used by the elderly, their caregivers, their families, or a mixture of all user groups? Based on data available in the public domain, we’re looking for prototypes/ ways/ proof of concept that will truly reimagine the aged care experience.
Victoria Citizen Science Department of Premier and Cabinet, Victoria 12 How might we create a citizen science experiment to support a better understanding of what is happening in the State of Victoria? Our citizens make our State a great place to live, work and play. We believe that citizen science can support a better understanding of what is happening around us. This is an open challenge to use data.vic data assets as part of a citizen science experiment.
Australian Capital Territory Community growth and recovery NTT 14 Local economies, particularly the hospitality and tourism sectors, have been hit hard this year with the bushfires and the effects of COVID-19. These challenges have a far reaching impact on our local communities. How might we help communities recover by encouraging people to engage safely with local businesses? 2020 has been a tough year. We’ve faced floods, damaging hailstorms, devastating bushfires and the effects of COVID-19. As a result, local economies and communities have experienced disruptions which will be felt for years to come. Particularly hard hit are our hospitality, tourism and entertainment sectors - which make a significant contribution to our community culture, wellbeing and standards of living. How might we take a data driven approach to help local communities recover? ### Additional Information: **We think data in the categories of health and community facilities and services might be particularly relevant. For example see these ACT datasets:** https://www.data.act.gov.au/browse?category=Health https://www.data.act.gov.au/browse?category=Infrastructure+and+Utilities https://actmapi-actgov.opendata.arcgis.com/search?tags=Community%20Facilities%20and%20Assets However, we encourage teams to be creative and use any relevant datasets they know of or find.
Australia Connecting our community in an emergency with mobile messaging TelstraDev 16 How can our local leaders use mobile messaging to connect with citizens in a safe, reliable, and effective way for emergency communications? In a crisis, one of the hardest things to manage is coordination of the citizens and volunteers. Making sure there is reliable and safe communication between parties is critical, and not always possible in natural disasters like bushfires when normal communication modes aren’t possible. SMS and MMS are still some of the most effective ways of communicating, as studies show texts to mobile are much more likely to be read and acted upon than email. For mass-communication, timing is crucial. We need to have robust, automated services in place that can get the right message, to the right people, at the right time. That’s where APIs come in. APIs (i.e Application Programming Interfaces) allow different apps and services to communicate with each other to: Access Data, Hide Complexity, Extend Functionality and add Security. Messaging APIs specifically allow us to send and receive SMS and MMS using a few lines of code. Integrate them in your platform to Allow scalable automation of services and Make workflows faster and more productive. Some examples of emergency situations where this would pose a challenge, is when volunteers are brought together at short notice. Or you might want to manage a workforce of public services that make cities safer and smarter. In an emergency situation, how can we communicate and coordinate the people and services to where they are needed most? To solve this challenge, we encourage you to work with different technologies that incorporate the Messaging API. ### Additional Information: **Video Presentation**: [Presentation of the Challenge](https://drive.google.com/file/d/1DVMTH4XnZl-p89LkGxchnjOmayDhgo2X/view?usp=sharing) **Technologies to highlight:** TelstraDev’s Messaging API (Free Trial available) **Other useful links:** • Learn more about communication APIs in the TelstraDev GovHack conference workshop: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JU4cA5JnQG8 • TelstraDev’s messaging API: https://dev.telstra.com/content/messaging-api • A short video explaining how to get started with the API: https://dev.telstra.com/content/get-started-telstradev-messaging-api
Aotearoa - New Zealand Connecting through Kōrero Proaxiom Holding LTD 2 How can we use data so that everyone can feel the power of connection through kōrero? Feeling alone? Isolated? Struggle to talk to people or find someone who can understand you? This challenge is about connecting people with others through the power of conversation. Using data, what can you see that is already in place to help those who struggle with connection? Could these solutions be further built out? Are there blockers that you can see for people? How can those blockers be broken down so that everyone can feel the power of connection through kōrero?
Victoria COVID-19 Economic / Social Recovery Department of Premier and Cabinet, Victoria 8 How might we use data to assist our understanding of what a post-COVID-19 Victoria may look like? The current pandemic is the largest disruption to our communities ever experienced by most Victorians. How we emerge from the crisis and rebuild is crucial. How might we use data to assist our understanding of what a post-COVID-19 Victoria may look like? What are the scenarios you can present through the datasets we have? What is possible? What does the future of work look like as we emerge from the pandemic?
Australia Data-driven decisions for improved disaster planning, management or recovery CSIRO 15 How might we equip decision makers with a data driven tool to support their communities in the face of climate change and natural disasters. Australia is exposed to natural disasters on a regular basis, and the cost to society, the environment and government is substantial. It is increasingly recognised that Australia needs systemic change in the way it deals with natural disasters. This was seen firsthand during the recent Black Summer bushfires, with a recent study estimating that over 3.5 billion animals may have been impacted and climate change predicted to continue to make many extreme events worse. Strategies must be developed to resist, absorb, accommodate, recover and transform in the face of natural disasters and climate change, including the effects of longer, hotter, drier summers, coupled with changes to the frequency and severity of cyclones, fires, droughts and floods. Through undertaking this challenge, you will enable communities to contribute to information flows and/or provide decision makers with the tools required to make more informed decisions on natural disaster planning, management and/or response strategies. You may also develop innovative solutions to inform communities, enabling them to more rapidly and effectively respond to the event and contribute to recovery efforts. ### Additional Information: **Suggested platforms to find CSIRO data:** https://data.csiro.au/collections https://www.ala.org.au/ https://portal.aodn.org.au/ https://portal.tern.org.au/#/ https://portal.ereefs.info/
Australia Data Driven IoT Insights for sustainable communities TelstraDev 14 How can data from connected devices on the wireless Internet of Things (IoT) network be used to make our community spaces - our homes, towns, cities or region - more efficient and sustainable? The Internet of Things connects BILLIONS of physical devices across the world. These devices could be smart lights, parking sensors, temperature monitors, water meters, pet trackers, security cameras, cars, glasses, plants, animals, kitchen appliances, park benches, fences, anything you can thing of! Those devices generate an incredible amount of data. That data may be useful to the owner of the device, AND if combined with other data points it could drive big data insights to our connected communities and spaces. Imagine if your security camera could tell your house that there are no cars in the garage, so the house can save energy by automatically turning off all the lights. Or if a water monitor in your pot plant could tell when it needed to be watered. This would make our lives easier, but also save power and water. There are many ways for these devices to connect to the internet. You could connect them with internet cables, or connect over Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Sigfox, and several other local networks. But arguably the easiest and fastest way to connect to the internet is by putting a SIM in those devices, so it can connect straight to the 3G/4G/5G network without you having to set up cables or configure passwords. This is ‘cellular’ IoT. At Telstra, we have 2 incredible cellular IoT technologies that are “Low Power Wide Area Networks” (LPWAN): NB-IoT and Cat-M1. With lower power required to connect, LPWAN IoT devices have a longer battery life. For rural deployments, this means less time spent going out to remote areas for battery changes, and in urban dense areas it means less disruption digging up underground sensors. Cellular IoT also allows rapid deployment, with minimal change to existing infrastructure; no dodgy wi-fi connections or cables, just set and forget! If you measure what matters, you can see the way people interact and use community spaces. That could be seeing when bins are full or empty, how much water is used or wasted, or how crowded a space is. TelstraDev invites you to think about how LPWAN cellular Internet of Things networks can take this data, match it with open data sources, and provide insights to our communities on ways we can be more efficient with our use of resources like energy, space and water. Remember, LPWAN and Cellular IoT is especially useful compared to other technologies for devices that are hard to reach, critical, or moving. Look at almost any part of our economy – healthcare, transport, logistics, agriculture, education or engineering – and you’ll see that we measure, monitor, video and track more things than ever before. ### Additional Information: **Video**: [Presentation of the Challenge](https://drive.google.com/file/d/1il8PF31entQfuq0EYxAx65UFlAVgSYfD/view?usp=sharing) **Technologies to highlight:** Telstra’s Low Power Wide Area Network Internet of Things technology, IoT connected devices with cellular IoT SIMs **Other useful links:** • Capabilities of the Telstra IoT Network: https://www.telstra.com.au/business-enterprise/products/internet-of-things/capabilities/iot-network • Purchase IoT Devices and Connectivity on TelstraDev: https://dev.telstra.com/iot-marketplace • Examples of devices on the cellular LPWAN IoT network for environmental monitoring: https://www.telstra.com.au/business-enterprise/products/internet-of-things/solutions/environment-monitoring • The future of IoT and 5G: https://exchange.telstra.com.au/our-iot-networks-are-joining-the-5g-family-future-proofing-for-years-to-come/
Aotearoa - New Zealand Day Tripper Proaxiom Holding LTD 3 How can we encourage visits to your favourite part of our paradise? Find a way to entice National Tourists to travel to your town! We believe that every inch of Aotearoa New Zealand is worth visiting, don't you?
South Australia Economic recovery, jobs and livelihoods in SA Department of Premier and Cabinet, SA 6 Supply chains are the entire process of producing a good or service, from sourcing raw materials to distributing the final product to market. How can we contribute to SA's economic resilience by focusing on the challenges and opportunities presented by disruptions to supply chains? 2020 has been a tough year and it has had a significant impact on our economy. The World Economic Forum recognises that supply chains are the backbone of the global economy. The health and quality of global supply chains is of critical importance in the globally connected economy, and of particular importance to net exporting countries like Australia. Key South Australian exports include alcoholic beverages, copper and international education. South Australia’s top three merchandise trading partners are: China, US and Malaysia. There have been plenty of disruptions, including those caused by natural disasters like bushfires and the COVID 19 pandemic. Examples of disruptions from COVID 19 include shortages of personal protective equipment for medical workers or decreases of international students due to travel restrictions. Examples of supply chain disruptions from natural disasters include shortages of grapes from specific regions for winemaking or the closure of tourism destinations due to fire. How can we contribute to SA's economic resilience by focussing on supply chains? We are open to any datasets for your creative ideas to showcase how we can contribute to South Australia’s economic recovery and secure jobs and livelihoods. ### Additional Information: **Other datasets that may be useful:** • Freight and road data on Data.gov.au • ABS
New South Wales Engaging communities in hazard reporting & safety NSW Rural Fire Service 18 How might we better prepare & deal with natural disasters in Australia? The annual rate of Cyclone, Bushfire, Flood and Storm events across Australia have increased by 100% - 300% since 2001. We know that in order to better prepare and deal with natural disasters we need to provide communities with clear warnings of natural hazards, improve consistency of information across jurisdictions and create reliable authoritative solutions that people can rely on. We also know that in times of crisis, people in disaster zones are often quicker to respond to community needs, may lose traditional channels of communication and rely on local resources in the area. We want to explore how might we make communities in close proximity to hazard-prone areas better equipped. This could include new creative ways to warn people about hazards, keep them informed or facilitate crowd-source data during and after a natural disaster. How might we make communities in close proximity to hazard-prone areas better equipped to: • Take action during a natural disaster • Communicate with each other & their loved ones; or • Get to know about community or public resources available to them ### Additional Information: **Other useful links:** • https://www.rfs.nsw.gov.au/news-and-media/stay-up-to-date/feeds • http://www.rfs.nsw.gov.au/feeds/majorIncidents.json
Australia Find hidden gems within COVID-19 lockdown Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC) 13 The new restrictions on movement in Melbourne have caused increased stress for Victorians. How can we use currently available datasets to show our fellow Australians what is already available for their quality of life within their 5km radius? On August 2nd, the Victorian Government introduced restrictions on movement in Melbourne, limiting both the reasons for being outdoors (groceries and exercise) and the distance people can travel from their homes (5km). Are there elements of neighbourhoods that can help Melbournians make the most of that limited time and travel distance to take care of their wellbeing? Use the existing datasets to explore the current situation; show residents those areas with the most opportunity for exercise, such as walking and cycling routes, in their 5km radiuses. When restrictions are lifted, help them get to know their neighbourhood by making a treasure hunt of features of interest such as open spaces, historic landmarks, street arts and/or exciting plants, trees, birds and animals. To gain maximum benefits from data assets, data needs to be Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable (FAIR principles). [The FAIR principles](https://ardc.edu.au/resources/working-with-data/fair-data/) are designed to support knowledge discovery and innovation by both humans and machines and support data and knowledge integration. Please identify which principles of FAIR were more important or were missing in your experience accessing different datasets. • Are data Findable on the internet through discovery portals (like Trove, Research Data Australia or Data.gov.au)? • Are data Accessible, either for download or by using a standardised protocol (API)? • Are data Interoperable, using standard data formats, language and vocabularies? • Are data Reusable in their initial richness and contain clear user rights and licenses? ### Additional Information: • [ARDC guide on FAIR data](https://ardc.edu.au/resources/working-with-data/fair-data/) • [AURIN Hackathon Guide](https://aurin.org.au/resources/hackathon-help/) • [Research Data Australia](https://ardc.edu.au/services/research-data-australia/) - ARDC provides an online portal for finding research data and associated projects, researchers, and data services • [Research Vocabularies Australia (RVA)](https://ardc.edu.au/services/research-vocabularies-australia/) - ARDC provides an easily accessible portal to controlled vocabularies used in research • AURIN has two options to geocode address information that would be ideal to map lists of features or citizen science applications: • [AURIN Portal](https://portal.aurin.org.au/) - freely available to academic/gov users [(documentation)](https://docs.aurin.org.au/portal-help/analysing-your-data/spatial-data-manipulation-tools/geocoder-workflow/) • [AURIN Data61/GNAF geocoder](https://geocoder.aurin.org.au/data61-gnaf/) - freely available to all users [(documentation)](https://aurin.org.au/resources/workbench/data61-gnaf-geocoder-tutorial/) • [ARDC guides on working with data](https://ardc.edu.au/resources/working-with-data/)
Aotearoa - New Zealand Getting Around Proaxiom Holding LTD 2 How can we move towards being a more accessible country? Not everyone can easily access things as others can. Take a look at the accessibility in your city, apartment building, office or local cafe. Is it easy to get around? Are signs easily readable? Are the footpaths wide enough? How can we move towards being a more accessible country?
Queensland Government Spending Queensland Government 2 What can we learn from government spending data? Every year the Queensland Government spends billions of dollars on a wide range of goods and services to support the delivery of frontline services for Queenslanders. Queensland Government purchasing activities align with the [Queensland Procurement Policy](https://www.forgov.qld.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/procurement/qldprocurementpolicy.pdf?v=1574136292), and from 1 July 2019 details of awarded contracts over $10,000 are published on the data.qld.gov.au portal. You can search [“Contract Disclosure”](https://www.data.qld.gov.au/dataset?q=contract+disclosure) to see a list. Can you identify savings, highlight efficiencies or extract any other insights? ### Additional Information: **Also see:** https://www.data.qld.gov.au/article/news-and-events/queenslands-govhack-2020-challenges
International Identifying government investment for enhancing community safety Infosys 16 How can governments apply resources so as to proactively address social issues before they escalate and require reactive interventions (e.g. social work, law enforcement etc.)? Reactive intervention by government agencies may not be the most effective way of pursuing community safety. Often,such intervention occurs too late - either where the wellbeing of individuals, families, or the broader community has been threatened, or once a crime has been committed. At the same time, governments (both commonwealth and state) deliver a wide variety of critical community services that can have a direct impact on community safety. There may be opportunities to change the delivery of services (e.g. redistribution, increasing, re-targeting, or changing the application of resources) so as to reduce the incidence or extent of social issues. Some governments have attempted such an investment model in limited ways (see https://www.theirfuturesmatter.nsw.gov.au/investment-approach/investment-modelling​). Where else (e.g. location, demographic, problem area etc.) could governments be looking to make such investment? How could this be visualised? Is the data amenable to analytics approaches that produces insights? Datasets that may be useful include Commonwealth and state datasets: family violence data; crime data, socio-demographic data; government service provision and take-up; drug and alcohol abuse data; employment data; education data; and so on.
New South Wales Improving government services with open data Department of Customer Service, NSW 14 How can we improve government services by using open government data? The NSW government is working to deliver better services to customers. Use NSW government open data to demonstrate how government services can be improved. We want a reusable data story that demonstrates the value that can be drawn from open data. This could be produced as an interactive webpage, visualisation, dashboard, video or animation.
Australia Industry assistance during COVID-19 Australian Tax Office (ATO) 15 How can we help identify and assist people in industries most affected by COVID-19? Many people have been heavily impacted by COVID-19. These impacts may be more than financial. ATO data may assist in identifying these people for targeted support, financial or otherwise. Identifying all impacted industries is a challenge. How do we know we are providing the full range of support to all people impacted
Aotearoa - New Zealand Keep it Out, Stamp it Out, Manage it, or Recover from it Whanganui District Emergency Management 6 How might we create a hack that could help New Zealand Keep It Out, Stamp It Out, Manage It, or Recover From a pandemic? The [New Zealand Influenza Pandemic Action Plan (2nd edn)](https://www.health.govt.nz/system/files/documents/publications/influenza-pandemic-plan-framework-action-2nd-edn-aug17.pdf) is the framework for New Zealand's COVID response. The Plan outlines six phases: Plan For It, Keep It Out, Stamp It Out, Manage It, Manage It: Post-Peak, and Recover From It. So far, Stamp It Out has worked. If or when we have to do it again, what can you create via GovHack that can help us (NZ) either Keep It Out, Stamp It Out, Manage It, or Recover From It? Ideas to get you started include hacks that could support vulnerable people or the isolated. Contract tracing, pandemic information and updates. Think about out there ideas like where to get PPE that matches your eye colour! The hack may not even be health related - so feel free to use any positive or negative experiences from Stages 3 and 4 to shape your hacking.
Victoria Learning from the Past Department of Premier and Cabinet, Victoria 9 How might we use data assets from Victoria and other jurisdictions to better understand bushfire events and their effects on communities and the environment? Victoria has experienced some catastrophic bushfire events over the last decade. We are not alone. Changing weather patterns have intensified bushfire activity across Australia. There are sources of data for these events over time across our State, Federal and local governments. How might we use data assets from Victoria and other jurisdictions to better understand these extreme events and their effects on communities and the environment? Cross the borders and bring datasets together to build the explanatory power of your entry. To qualify for the Victorian Government GovHack prizes participants must use one or more datasets from data.vic. Participants are encouraged to think deeply and broadly about how to sense-make with data in this challenge.
Aotearoa - New Zealand Learn to be Green Proaxiom Holding LTD 1 Because of the lockdowns the world became a cleaner place - moving forward how do we work towards keeping it like this? Challenge sponsored by Proaxiom Holding LTD
Aotearoa - New Zealand Making the most of your KiwiSaver Proaxiom Holding LTD 1 How can we make Financial Literacy fun whilst learning about making the most of your KiwiSaver? Encourage people to think ahead and get the most out of their KiwiSaver by learning how it all works. What hack can you think of?
International Markets for recycled organic products made from food and garden organics Encycle Consulting 3 Food waste occurs from the farm to restaurants to households. When nutrients and carbon are buried in landfill, there is significant impact on the environment and public health through greenhouse gas emissions, pollution, biodiversity loss and resource depletion. How might we support the case for processing food waste into recycled organic products? Our local councils are responsible for organising collection and treatment of waste and recycling after we put it in our kerbside bins. Local councils are rolling out food and garden organic (FOGO) collections to process this waste into recycled organic (RO) products like composts, mulches and soil conditioners. These RO products can be used for example to enhance our nutrient-poor arable soils for growing crops. Using data and IT-based solutions preferably from Western Australia, consider the following questions to build a case for supporting the rollout of the FOGO system: • How can we identify the markets for FOGO-derived RO products? • Does it matter to the market what RO products are made from? • What are the likely community perceptions about using these types of RO products? • What could be the potential size of the market for these RO products? • What are the challenges and barriers to developing markets in Western Australia? Developing markets for RO products beyond the ‘local government parks & gardens’ sector in Western Australia may require product specific ingredients and application. For example, farmers may require an assessment of soil and cropping regime to determine the application of RO products, level of nutrients and trace elements required. ### Additional Information: According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, waste is Australia’s most rapidly increasing environmental and economic metric. The National Food Waste Strategy estimates that over 5.3 million tonnes of food that is intended for human consumption is wasted from households, commercial and industrial entities each year. As outlined in the Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategy 2030, West Australians generate more waste per capita than people in other states and territories, and we have the second lowest rate of recovering resources from waste. Local government waste audit data has shown that FOGO can comprise up to 50% of household waste that we dispose to municipal solid waste (i.e. the red lidded bin). The [Better Bins Plus: Go FOGO](https://www.wasteauthority.wa.gov.au/images/resources/files/Better_Bins_Plus_Go_FOGO_-_Funding_guidelines.pdf) program is an initiative of the Government of Western Australia, delivered by the Waste Authority, supporting local governments to provide better practice three bin kerbside collection systems with a separate FOGO service (i.e. the green lidded bin).
Tasmania Most Outstanding Tasmanian Benefit (GovHack 2020) Department of Premier and Cabinet, Tasmania 11 How can we use Open Data to most benefit residents of Tasmania? Take any Tasmanian data and use it to create something that will benefit the residents of Tasmania.
Tasmania Most Tasmanian Commercial Benefit (GovHack 2020) Department of Premier and Cabinet, Tasmania 7 How can we use Tasmanian Data to create something that could be an economic success? Create any project that you believe could go on to have Commercial success. Projects must use Tasmanian Data in some form or another.
Tasmania Open challenge to benefit the greater Launceston community City of Launceston 7 How can your idea benefit the community of Launceston? This is an open challenge so come up with something creative. An open challenge with a focus on the Launceston region and its community. https://www.launceston.tas.gov.au/Home
Queensland Pandemic Survival Queensland Government 7 Help us survive a pandemic! COVID-19 has spread across the world causing significant death and illness to millions. Living in lock-down, social distancing, contract tracing, accessing health care and improving fitness have all been used to minimise negative effects. How can we improve these services to aid recovery and prepare for future pandemics? ### Additional Information: **Also see:** https://www.data.qld.gov.au/article/news-and-events/queenslands-govhack-2020-challenges
Western Australia Plan your vote. Here’s how. WA Electoral Commission 5 ‘Plan your way to vote’ – how can we assist voters to identify ways of voting that are convenient for them and match their circumstances? Voters have traditionally visited their local school or hall on a Saturday to pick up their democracy sausage and cast a vote in a State election. Some voted early if they couldn’t make the Saturday for a particular reason, including if they were interstate, overseas or faced other accessibility challenges. With the number of people now having work, sport and other personal commitments on a Saturday, the proportion of people voting early has risen to 50%+. Where it was previously feasible to publish a list of polling locations and wait for people to seek out this information, that’s not how people consume information in the age of social media and other new media. Voters increasingly expect information to be delivered to them directly. The current situation also doesn’t account for the varying times of the day and week when people now seek to vote, at locations near or far from home and work. In the age of COVID-19, there’s another cohort of people who aren’t keen to congregate and queue up to cast a vote for health and distancing reasons, so will be seeking options and opportunities to vote when it’s ‘quieter’. For remote communities and nursing homes, it’s possible that electoral officials won’t be allowed to visit to take votes. Information that voters should have access to include: Where? – Close to work? Close to home? Close to ‘here’? Nursing home? Remote community? Interstate? Overseas? When? – On Polling Day? At work? After work? Before the wedding? How? – In person? By post? By telephone? Remote polling? Mobile polling? Who? – Self? Family member? Relative? ### Additional Information: **Additional links:** LG Boundaries - https://catalogue.data.wa.gov.au/dataset/local-government-authority-lga-boundaries Localities - https://catalogue.data.wa.gov.au/dataset/localities ABS Census Statistical Area Boundaries - https://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/1270.0.55.001July%202016?OpenDocument
South Australia Predicting unusual and unexpected surges in demand for health services Commission for Excellence and Innovation in Health (CEIH), SA 4 How can publicly available data be used to predict unusual and unexpected surges in demand for health services that could be avoided and identify opportunities to intervene? Health services perform a vital role in keeping the community healthy. People will interact with health services in a variety of different ways. For example, visiting the doctor (General Practitioner – GP), being seen at an emergency department/service, being treated at a hospital but not staying overnight (outpatient), or staying overnight in a hospital (admitted as a patient). These can be planned and scheduled in advance or unplanned visits. There are often occasions where people do not need to attend a busy emergency department or GP but do so because they may not be aware of alternate options. Or in some cases, earlier intervention could have meant avoiding a trip to the hospital if the health problem were detected before it became serious. There have been proven studies of activity on social media and other publicly available data sources being used to detect emerging public health events and demand for health services. Using these types of open data, how can we predict unusual and unexpected surges in health service demand? How can health services intervene earlier, and make people aware of or funnel people towards services that best fit their healthcare needs? ### Additional Information: **Other resources that may help:** • http://phidu.torrens.edu.au/social-health-atlases/topic-atlas/pph#potentially-preventable-hospitalisations-atlas-data • Social media / search engine trends and analytics
Victoria Proactively reducing rubbish and pollution in our waterways Melbourne Water 6 When rubbish and pollutants enter our waterways, it harms our aquatic life and spoils the amenity of our community spaces. How can we use open data to proactively reduce rubbish and common pollutants from entering our waterways so that we protect our natural environment and keep our rivers and creeks clean today, so that we can enjoy them tomorrow? The management of rubbish/litter is a universal problem for government and our community, it is also an important aspect of maintaining the health of our waterways. Each year, Melbourne Water removes almost 1500 cubic metres of litter, debris and sediment from our waterways. When undertaking this challenge, it can be useful to consider the originating source of litter, hot-spot areas where litter has accumulated, different collection methods and ultimate disposal via landfill or recycling. We have shared some of the existing initiatives underway to help combat litter in our waterways. You may wish to consider how open data can complement existing initiatives or potentially generate entirely new opportunities to reduce litter from entering our waterways. ### Additional Information: **You can read about some of the existing initiatives here:** The Litter Action Program and Litter Trackers: https://www.melbournewater.com.au/community-and-education/be-citizen-scientist/litter-action The Litterati app: https://www.melbournewater.com.au/community-and-education/be-citizen-scientist/litter-action/download-litterati-app and https://www.melbournewater.com.au/what-we-are-doing/news/app-way-track-rubbish-hot-spots-along-dandenong-creek Diamond Creek Litter Source Reduction Workshop: https://www.melbournewater.com.au/what-we-are-doing/events/diamond-creek-litter-source-reduction-workshop Community Litter Clean-up Activities: https://www.melbournewater.com.au/what-we-are-doing/events/clean-australia-day-stony-creek and https://www.melbournewater.com.au/what-we-are-doing/events/yarra-river-blitz School Programs and Litter Action Groups: https://www.melbournewater.com.au/what-we-are-doing/news/stopping-litter-source-students-say-its-wrap and https://www.melbournewater.com.au/what-we-are-doing/events/love-our-streets-manor-lakes-litter-group-launch Gross Pollutant Traps: https://www.melbournewater.com.au/planning-and-building/stormwater-management/options-treating-stormwater/gross-pollutant-traps Incentives Programs: https://www.melbournewater.com.au/what-we-are-doing/news/river-health-grants-celebrate-community-contributions-healthy-waterways-0
Aotearoa - New Zealand Rail vs Roading Proaxiom Holding LTD 0 Rail vs Roading: which is more beneficial to communities and how do you prove it? Heavy rail, light rail, roads - they all have their pros and cons. How can you use open data to explore the options and find out which is best for our communities? ### Additional information: **Links that may assist:** https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/300063919/election-2020-light-vs-heavy-rail-to-determine-future-of-auckland-transport https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rail_transport_in_New_Zealand https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transport_in_New_Zealand
New South Wales Re-energising our city centre during the COVID-19 pandemic Liverpool City Council 7 In the midst of, and following, the COVID-19 pandemic, how can Liverpool City Council and the community use data to access the right information and tools to create a vibrant Liverpool city centre where people feel safe and the local economy can grow and prosper? Liverpool Local Government Area is the home of Western Sydney Airport and the city centre has positioned itself as Sydney’s third CBD. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a serious impact on the economy with around 9500 businesses applying for JobKeeper. There is a deep concern about the impact the pandemic will have on the local economy over the short and medium term. Council has implemented a support package including grants to build business capacity and resilience to recover and withstand future shocks. More than 190 businesses applied for Council’s Business Resilience Grants program. At the same time Council has developed a Liverpool City Centre Public Domain masterplan - a 10-year vision to guide the development of public space and pave the way to a greener, more vibrant and active city centre while fostering an 18-hour economy. Some of the questions Council is considering include: • How do we integrate active transport (ie walking, cycling) and safe activation (events/activities) into the CBD? • How can we create a better CBD that is inclusive (ie parents with prams, people with disabilities) and feels safe from crime and safe from COVID19 (there is a perception about crime in Liverpool that is not the reality). • Are there emerging industries (ie urban agriculture, co-working spaces) that we can incorporate into the CBD? How do we create jobs and grow the Liverpool CBD economy at this time? • How do we make a 30km speed limit attractive and tackle congestion? • How do we make residents and businesses want slower traffic, to use public transport? • How do we convince businesses on Bigge Street to give up roadside parking for their medical services when the customers may be frail or have disabilities. Bigge Street is a bottleneck congestion point because one of two lanes is used for parking outside business. ### Additional Information: **Useful Links:** Liverpool City Council website: https://www.liverpool.nsw.gov.au/ Liverpool City Council Covid-19 business support package information: https://www.liverpool.nsw.gov.au/business/support-for-businesses-impacted-by-covid-19 Liverpool City Council major projects: https://www.liverpool.nsw.gov.au/development/major-projects Public Domain masterplan: https://www.liverpool.nsw.gov.au/development/major-projects/public-domain-master-plan JobKeeper postcode data: https://treasury.gov.au/coronavirus/jobkeeper/data
Aotearoa - New Zealand Responding to the next regional, country or world emergency Infosys 5 How can we better respond to the next regional, country or world emergency by leveraging emerging technologies and the plethora of government datasets available? There are many emergencies that we face at an individual, local, regional, country or worldwide level. Not all emergencies are equal but may affect you, your family, community, governments and countries in varying ways. Select an emergency situation that is relevant to your team and work with the latest technologies - whether that’s AI, Machine Learning, automation, to: • Improve our ability to respond to the emergency • Improve individual, community, government ability to provide better and outcomes and safer services Some emergency situations could be, bushfires, earthquakes, pandemics, civil unrest, weather events, border control, water shortages, and global warming, as examples. Leverage the numerous datasets available across government. Feel free to think outside the box. This could take the form of an app, UI automation, ways to access or visualise data, linking of decisions to statistics or key inputs, or summarising the information used to support a decision. Outcomes may include better analysis and access to information that helps and informs decisions at your local, family, regional, country level that improves outcomes during emergency situations. You are welcome to use any data sets as a part of your submission as well.
Tasmania Rethinking mobility for a more accessible Hobart City of Hobart 3 Micromobility has the potential to reduce Hobart’s congestion. Given Hobart’s topography and location of residential and retail precincts, our challenge is to understand which micromobility vehicles, routes and nodes would be beneficial to making the city quicker to navigate for the largest number of vehicle types and transport users. While active transport is very popular in Hobart, large numbers of very short car trips tend to congest the streets and lead to increasing demands for parking lanes. We want to understand the potential effect of micromobility technologies, most likely in the form of electric scooters available to hire on Hobart’s traffic density. Data is available to describe topography, distance between Hobart’s retail precincts, population density, estimated numbers of car trips, number of available parking spots etc. Scooter hire companies will provide details of scooter power, speed, accessible gradients, battery life etc. From this and other available data it should be possible to map the city into scooter-accessible zones and create estimates of trip times in the city. It should also be possible to estimate what effect each micromobility trip will have in reducing both car movements and parking requirements in the city. ### Additional Information: ABS Data: COMMUTING DISTANCE FOR AUSTRALIA https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/2071.0.55.001 **Other relevant documents:** City of Hobart – Transport Strategy https://www.hobartcity.com.au/files/assets/public/strategies-and-plans/transport-strategy/draft-transport-strategy-2018-30.pdf Hobart 2010 Public Spaces and Public Life https://www.hobartcity.com.au/files/assets/public/strategies-and-plans/gehl-report/01_final_report_-_introduction.pdf https://www.hobartcity.com.au/files/assets/public/strategies-and-plans/gehl-report/02_final_report_-_analysis.pdf https://www.hobartcity.com.au/files/assets/public/strategies-and-plans/gehl-report/03_final_report_-_recommendations.pdf https://www.hobartcity.com.au/files/assets/public/strategies-and-plans/gehl-report/04_final_report_-_public_life_data.pdf Google maps traffic https://www.google.com/search?q=google+maps+traffic&rlz=1C1GCEB_enAU891AU891&oq=google+maps+traffic&aqs=chrome.0.69i59j0l7.5568j0j15&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 TomTom Hobart Traffic https://www.tomtom.com/en_gb/traffic-index/hobart-traffic Scooter data Any relevant scooter data from scooter companies
International Science Tasker Amazon Web Services 11 How might we harness the power of the everyday citizen to conduct ongoing scientific research which has been hindered by constraints on travel due to COVID-19 Whilst the country has slowed down and been hindered and unable to move around, scientific needs have not stopped. This solution looks to find a way to serve ongoing scientific research that has been hindered by constraints on travel due to COVID-19. There are various environmental measurements that need to be taken for scientific and research purposes across Australia and New Zealand. The solution would allow for scientific research agencies to post citizen scientist tasks, such as collect a water sample, tree / leaf sample, video recording of animals at night etc. Citizens can apply to do the task, and the agency sends out a collection / sample kit and a return satchel. Citizens will earn badges and points, and move up leaderboards. For original research, significant contributors get recognition on the research paper.
Queensland Small Business and Tourism Queensland Government 6 Small business and the tourism industry need your help to survive! How can we get them back on track? Queensland is home to over 400,000 small businesses which employ over 40% of all private sector workers! Tourism in Queensland accounts for roughly $25 billion, or 7.8% of Queensland’s gross state product. COVID-19 has affected both industries severely! What can we do to help their recovery? ### Additional Information: **Also see:** https://www.data.qld.gov.au/article/news-and-events/queenslands-govhack-2020-challenges
Tasmania Smart lighting for efficiency and dark skies in Hobart City of Hobart 3 Cities spend millions every year lighting their streets. In an era of efficiency and emissions reductions there are smarter ways to maintain safety without lighting empty streets. We have the data. We want big ideas. Legislation requires certain levels of lighting for safety and security. But cities have become lazy and every night we light every street in the city, whether someone is there or not. Lighting is unmetered, so we pay for 10 hours a day, whether the light is working or not. If we dim or turn off a light, we still pay. Armed with a dataset of Hobart’s street lights, their energy consumption and location, we are looking for big ideas about how we might rethink city lighting. Can we meter each light individually? What savings can we achieve by installing LEDs to replace higher power technology? What if we dim lights to 10% when nobody is in the street? How do we maintain the correct level of lighting and sense of safety when somebody walks or drives into an area? Can we achieve better dark skies outcomes by changing out lighting regimes? Could we use solar and battery power? Consider the following inputs: • Lighting energy costs • Lighting network charges • Lighting replacement costs • Lighting maintenance costs • Pole installation costs • Solar pole costs ### Additional Information: **Other relevant documents:** City of Hobart: Energy Efficiency Tour https://www.hobartcity.com.au/files/assets/public/climate-change-sustainability-and-energy-use/climate-and-environment-documents/coh_energy_efficiencytour_2016_v2.pdf#page=8 Connected Hobart: Smart City Action Plan https://www.hobartcity.com.au/files/assets/public/strategies-and-plans/hcc4578-smart-cities-action-plan-a3-single_110919.pdf Hobart 2010 Public Spaces and Public Life https://www.hobartcity.com.au/files/assets/public/strategies-and-plans/gehl-report/01_final_report_-_introduction.pdf https://www.hobartcity.com.au/files/assets/public/strategies-and-plans/gehl-report/02_final_report_-_analysis.pdf https://www.hobartcity.com.au/files/assets/public/strategies-and-plans/gehl-report/03_final_report_-_recommendations.pdf https://www.hobartcity.com.au/files/assets/public/strategies-and-plans/gehl-report/04_final_report_-_public_life_data.pdf
Australia The language of leadership Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC) 7 In times of crisis words can inspire and unite us, but they can also provoke division and conflict. How has the language of Australia’s leaders changed over time? How can we represent these changes in public discourse within a historical timeline? In these extraordinary times we’ve seen widely differing language and approaches across and within different countries, some aiming to bring people together, others potentially aiming to leverage the disturbance to reach other goals. Through many available datasets and collections in Australia we have a rich record of how our public leaders have spoken, the words, the sentiment, and the subjects. Use existing datasets to derive an understanding how changes in tone and language over time reflect desired outcomes and affect our responses, which is increasingly important in a world where information streams from myriad sources at ultra-high speed. You might look at how the use of particular words or phrases has changed over time; focus on the context in which particular names, places, or events are discussed; or look at ways in which political language has shaped or reflected public discussion by comparing official sources with other media such as newspapers. Have words such as 'community' or 'economy' always meant the same thing? How have changes in the global political landscape affected the way we talk and feel about our place in the world? What does the flow of ideas between the public and political spheres suggest about the nature of our democracy? To gain maximum benefits from data assets, data needs to be Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable (FAIR principles). [The FAIR principles](https://ardc.edu.au/resources/working-with-data/fair-data/) are designed to support knowledge discovery and innovation by both humans and machines and support data and knowledge integration. Please identify which principles of FAIR were more important or were missing in your experience accessing different datasets. • Are data Findable on the internet through discovery portals (like Trove, Research Data Australia or Data.gov.au)? • Are data Accessible, either for download or by using a standardised protocol (API)? • Are data Interoperable, using standard data formats, language and vocabularies? • Are data Reusable in their initial richness and contain clear user rights and licenses? ### Additional Information: • [ARDC guide on FAIR data](https://ardc.edu.au/resources/working-with-data/fair-data/) • [Research Data Australia](https://ardc.edu.au/services/research-data-australia/) - ARDC provides an online portal for finding research data and associated projects, researchers, and data services • [Research Vocabularies Australia (RVA)](https://ardc.edu.au/services/research-vocabularies-australia/) - ARDC provides an easily accessible portal to controlled vocabularies used in research • [ARDC guides on working with data](https://ardc.edu.au/resources/working-with-data/) • Trove newspapers • OCRd text from Trove [books](https://glam-workbench.github.io/trove-books/#ocrd-text-from-trove-books-and-ephemera) and [journals](https://glam-workbench.github.io/trove-journals/#ocrd-text-from-trove-digitised-journals) • [Australian Web Archive](https://webarchive.nla.gov.au/collection) **Video Presentation**: [Presentation of the Challenge](https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ieTZWZeh267n2-VuSE09Pq5mX3IWLj8w/view?usp=sharing)
Aotearoa - New Zealand Thinking Outside the Box L I G H T + v e s s e l 5 This challenge is about showing your artistic side. Use data to create something artistic which fits into any of the 2020 GovHack Themes
Australia Track and trace: help end plastic waste CSIRO 11 Plastics contaminate Australia’s lands and seas, and challenge our industries, communities and decision makers with an exponentially growing problem. How might we enable and empower Australians to help de-plasticise our country and report plastic waste in our environment for a healthier future. Plastics are everywhere in our lives due to their cheap manufacture, light weight and effectiveness as packaging solutions. However, as their use increases, plastic waste is becoming a huge threat to our environment and health. In particular, marine debris is a globally recognised environmental issue of increasing concern. CSIRO research has already found that in Australia, three-quarters of rubbish found along our coastline is plastic and comes from Australian sources. CSIRO’s research has also shown that people are the greatest contributor of plastic waste, and therefore potentially the greatest solution. Plastic getting into the environment is often hard to track and understand. To look for patterns, scientists need relevant environmental data from communities to help improve our understanding of the types, amounts and sources of plastic that are polluting Australia. In response to this challenge, you will empower members of the community to report, measure and identify plastic waste in their environment. This will inform decision makers and underpin policy and strategy to benefit all Australians. Together we can contribute to reducing the amount of plastic entering the environment and end plastic waste. Consider the ways you could document plastic in the environment and the ways it should be recorded.
Queensland Understanding the impact of climate change on extreme weather events on the Sunshine Coast Sunshine Coast Council 8 From bushfires to rain and flooding, weather events are increasing in number and strength due to climate change. How might we provide policy advisors and researchers with the keys to communicate the increasing risks and drive change in government policy and public behaviour? Climate change is a global, national and a local issue which is expected to impact our region's natural environment, economy and liveability. We can also expect changes in the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events such as cyclones, storms, droughts, heat waves and flooding. This may cause damage to buildings and infrastructure and increase the frequency and severity of bush fires, which could also increase maintenance costs and insurance premiums. How can we build a robust model to assist with development of communications about the heightened risks of bush fires? Can a model of extreme weather events clearly illustrate the increasing regularity and intensity of these extreme events as a strong case for the development of highly effective policy and budgeted implementation programs? Your use of data sets from multiple sources can be integrated into a tool for the Sunshine Coast with easy replication in other areas to help drive the local government sustainability agenda from the grass roots level, while also relevant at state and national levels. For example you could create a model based on aggregated time series datasets. Sources: various including https://els.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au/Planning-for-the-future/Climate-change ### Additional Information: **Additional links:** https://els.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au/Planning-for-the-future/Climate-change https://data.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au/ https://data.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au/browse?category=Environment https://www.inaturalist.org/
New South Wales Using Liquor & Gaming data to provide information to customers Department of Customer Service, NSW 5 How can Liquor & Gaming NSW data be used to provide information to customers? Use Liquor & Gaming NSW data to present information about licensed premises in NSW to customers. This may mean developing an app or a dashboard to make information about licensed premises accessible. We are open to any concepts that are developed; however, we would like to see how the tools listed below can be used in conjunction with the premises list dataset to provide information to customers in a user-friendly way: • [LiveData tool](https://livedata.liquorandgaming.nsw.gov.au/) – LiveData is an online tool that allows you to search the latest liquor licence information alongside demographic, alcohol-related crime and health data for every suburb and Local Government Area in NSW • [Find my LIA band tool](https://trade.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=83b2df269774468eab7d44cf51b3a7d3) – The Local Impact Assessment (LIA) scheme classifies all areas within NSW based on the risk of introducing additional gaming machines into that area.
Australia Withdrawing super during COVID-19 Australian Tax Office (ATO) 10 How do people understand and prepare for their long term financial needs after withdrawing their superannuation during COVID-19? The financial situation of many people has been negatively impacted by COVID-19. To support these people, the Australian Government is allowing [eligible](https://www.ato.gov.au/Individuals/Super/In-detail/Withdrawing-and-using-your-super/COVID-19-early-release-of-super/?anchor=Eligibility#Eligibility) citizens and permanent residents of Australia or New Zealand to access up to $10,000 of their super. This could be done in the 2019-20 and the 2020-21 financial years. However, accessing superannuation early can have negative impacts such as needing to work longer to accumulate the required balance for retirement. How do we help people to understand and prepare them for the long term financial impacts of doing this?